Media for Diversity and Migrant Integration

Beyond the Self-expressive Creative Worker: An Industry Perspective on Entertainment Media

TitleBeyond the Self-expressive Creative Worker: An Industry Perspective on Entertainment Media
Publication TypeJournal Article
CountryUnited Kingdom
Year of Publication2008
AuthorsChristopherson, S.
Journal TitleTheory, Culture and Society
Volume25
Issue7-8
Pagination73-95
PublisherSAGE
Place PublishedLondon
Type of WorkJournal article
1) Abstract

This article examines how production trends, influenced by conglomerate domination of production and distribution, are affecting the media workforce. In particular, it looks at three tendencies. The first is a widening split between core workers and peripheral workers employed in industry projects. The second is a change in professional and craft identities as a result of technological specialization by freelancers and the loss of union control over production projects. Finally, it is the persistence of 'hard wired' social and economic networks to reduce worker and employer risk. These networks foster labour segmentation among women and men, and among ethnic groups, restricting access to job opportunities and careers.

2.1) Publication LanguageEnglish
2.2) Type & Structure

(untitled) Introduction; A Note on the Evidence; Sources of Change and Adaptation in the US Media Entertainment Industry; Producer Strategy in Television and Independent Film: Location and labor; Deepening the Core-Periphery Divide and a Shrinking Middle-class Workforce; The Decline of Professional and Craft Identities and the Rise of the Hybrid, Crossover Workforce; The Continued Significance of Exclusionary Networks; What Can an Approach that is Sensitive to Time and Industrial Context Add to Our Understanding of Creative Work?

2.3) Original Research or Not

YES

3.1) Main Issues

The widening split between core workers and peripheral workers employed in industry projects; the change in professional and craft identities as a result of technological specialization by freelancers and the loss of union control over production projects; the persistence of 'hard wired' social and economic networks to reduce worker and employer risk.

3.2) Media

Evidence is derived from a study of industry patterns that included 40 interviews with directors, producers, leaders in both unions and guilds, and studio owners as well as analysis of prosperity data and publicly available data on industry production trends and employment.

3.3) Media Genres

TV; entertainment films

3.4) Key Theories

Industrial and production organisation theories

4.1) Relevance

It is relevant to media employment strategies by considering the role of economic and social networks.

Keywordscreative labour, recruitment procedures, United Kingdom
Tagscreative industry, creative worker, networks